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Why is this remote so &!;!!?? complicated!!!! Switching sources

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Last time we talked about why remotes seem to be so difficult.  We said that, if not designed correctly in a system that incorporates equipment that is new enough to have “discrete” codes, telling the remote if the TV, or any other piece of equipment, is on or off, for example, could create a big problem.

The second biggest PITA (pain in the -_- (you know)), is changing from one source to another.  Let’s say you are watching your Spectrum cable box and you want to switch to Apple TV (or Roku, a Sony Blu-Ray player, an Amazon Firestick, or any other source you can think of).  How do you do that?

To further complicate matters, there are three words used by manufacturers to make this happen.  Some call it a “Source” button, some “TV/Video” and still others “Input.”  Regardless, what this means is the ability to switch from one source of content to another.

Much like we said in the last blog post regarding the importance of having a true POWER ON and POWER OFF command, having direct access to EACH input is what’s important.  Whether you have a television or an audio video receiver (AVR), being able to access Input 1 versus Input 4 (or TV / Sat versus Blu-Ray, for example on an AVR) is critical so everything works smoothly.

We are back to our old friend, the “discrete code.”  The products we recommend and use, all have codes for EACH INDIVIDUAL INPUT so that we can access them quickly, directly, and consistently EVERY TIME.  This makes your experience consistent and reliable.  What’s great is that, regardless of the brand of equipment used, we can mix and match so that when you press the WATCH ROKU button, everything happens behind the scenes in a “macro” (more on that word next time),  and you get to watch and hear your Roku player.

Oh, yeah, we subscribe to the Watch and Listen nomenclature.  This means, on the remotes we work with, most notably the Control 4 SR260 and Control 4 OS3 app, when you want to “watch” something you press the “Watch” button and when you want to “listen” to something, you press the “Listen” button.  The main difference being, if you listen to something, we typically don’t turn on the TV.

So, now you get the jist of why these discrete codes are so important.  Next time, we will show you a little behind the scenes trick on how we do a bunch of things in succession and further cement why these codes are so important.  We will enter the world of macros….  Next time….

In the meantime, if you have a question, give us a call at 704-696-2792 or email us at [email protected]

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